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Remembering The Past: Gas Globes

Beginning in 1912, glass gasoline globes decorated the tops of gas pumps across the United States. For almost half a century, into the 1950s, the recognizable lighted logos were a welcome sight to anyone traveling who needed a fuel stop. By the 1960s, most of them had disappeared. Today they have become collector items.

The most popular gasoline globes are those with bright colors and/or cool graphics.

It is recommended by some that if you plan to collect them, you focus on a particular type, such as globes from your home region, or globes from a particular oil company. (But that’s not to say that if you find one that really appeals to you, even if it doesn’t fit your “specialty,” that you shouldn’t give it a place in your collection.)

Several years ago, Schiffer Publishing published Gas Globes, Pennzoil to Union, by Benjamin and Henderson, which pictures more than a thousand globes. While it is most likely the values given no longer are accurate in today’s market place, it will give a collector an idea of the vast array of gas globes that were made in the first half of the 20th century and some ideas of relative rarity.

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French Lady Doll Fine But Expensive

During the 1860s, ’70s and ’80s, bisque and parian doll heads with elaborately molded hairstyles and headdresses were turned out in great quantity and variety by several European countries.

The French seem to have concentrated on quality. M. Jumeau’s invention of a fine biscuit-porcelain head for dolls, in 1862, promoted the perfection of the French Lady Doll. The coloring and modeling were both extremely delicate. Some of these dolls had real jewels attached to the ears and neck.

A home of moderate wealth would probably have several lady dolls, with several changes of clothing for each. Although they were not considered playthings as dolls are usually thought of, little girls could dress and undress them in imitation of the roles they would be expected to maintain as adults.

Germany, specializing in mass production and manufacturing shortcuts, led all the other countries in the production of china head dolls, but the quality was less, and continued to deteriorate as time went on.

By the late 1880s, the craze for the expensive French type had begun to diminish, although the less expensive German heads were till plentiful for several more years.

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Registration Marks Are Helpful In
Dating Items

During the 1860s, ’70s and ’80s, bisque and parian doll heads with elaborately molded hairstyles and headdresses were turned out in great quantity and variety by several European countries.

The French seem to have concentrated on quality. M. Jumeau’s invention of a fine biscuit-porcelain head for dolls, in 1862, promoted the perfection of the French Lady Doll. The coloring and modeling were both extremely delicate. Some of these dolls had real jewels attached to the ears and neck.

A home of moderate wealth would probably have several lady dolls, with several changes of clothing for each. Although they were not considered playthings as dolls are usually thought of, little girls could dress and undress them in imitation of the roles they would be expected to maintain as adults.

Germany, specializing in mass production and manufacturing shortcuts, led all the other countries in the production of china head dolls, but the quality was less, and continued to deteriorate as time went on.

By the late 1880s, the craze for the expensive French type had begun to diminish, although the less expensive German heads were till plentiful for several more years.

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